Slainte Mhath!

The only thing you add to whisky is a little bit of water, or more whisky

This was part of our introduction to Scotch Whisky on a recent tour of Glengoyne Distillery in the Scotland Highlands. We learned so many compelling facts on this tour

  • the distillery is located at the base of Dumgoyne Hill – a name that was not used in the Distillery name for obvious reasons 🙂
  • the color of whisky comes from the maturing process. They mature the alcohol in oak barrels from Spain which had been previously used to store Sherry. Over the years, the various flavors and colors from the wood seep into the alcohol giving whisky a burgundy color. The longer the maturing process, the darker the whisky.
  • Most whisky distilleries produce more in a week than Glengoyne produces in a year.  In fact, Glengoyne distills whisky slower than any other single malt distillery. However, there is a quality in this slower process that has been recognized. Queen Victoria’s dinner tables featured Glengoyne whisky exclusively up until she died.
  • Glengoyne specializes in 10, 17, 21 and 40 year old bottles. One bottle of 40 year old whisky commands £3760!

We enjoyed the rich taste of Glengoyne’s Scotch but what we savored more was whisky flavored fudge. Readily available in any tourist shop are several brands of whisky infused fudge and other sweets. I love how the artwork on this particular brand (Gardiners) mirrors exactly the layout and buildings of the Glengoyne distillery. I wouldn’t be surprised if there was a bit of whisky in every dessert we had while we were in Scotland.

At the end of our tour and coincidentally, our visit to Scotland, we were taught the meaning of Slainte Mhath – pronounced, believe it or not, as ‘Slan-guh Vahh’ . It is a Scottish Gaelic term for ‘Cheers’ or ‘To your Health’ – the perfect way to end a blog post or a pleasant visit with friends.

Slainte Mhath on the days that we see you and the days that we don’t


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